Monday, October 8, 2012

Funeral Sandwiches


I tried these for the first time yesterday for our semi-annual General Conference luncheon.  I had found several recipes online and read many rave reviews, so I figured I would give them a try.  They were a huge hit.  I combined, then modified two different recipes, so I guess the end-result would be MINE.



Funeral Sandwiches
(I might need to find another name)

Dinner rolls*
24+ slices Black Forest Ham (I used Castlewood brand from Sam's, deli ham would be great too)
24 slices Swiss Cheese (I used the pre-sliced Tillamook, and cut the slices into smaller squares, then also used the edge pieces, 2 edge slices per sandwich)

Slice rolls, if needed.  Squeeze 24 rolls on an 11x15 inch sheet pan (it's okay if they are touching).  Place one slice of ham (some of my slices were super thin, so I added another half slice with those) and one slice of cheese on the bottom half of each roll, then replace tops.

*Most recipes I found called for King's Hawaiian Rolls.  I am not a fan of their texture and sweetness, so I opted to go for the dinner rolls from Sam's Club.  They were perfectly chewy (not spongey) and perfectly sweet with the following sauce.

Sauce of yumminess:
1 cube butter, melted
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbs. Dijon mustard
1 Tbs. Worcestershire sauce
1 Tbs. poppy seeds (I used slightly less - they are mostly for aesthetics, I think)
1 tsp. onion powder

Mix together with a small whisk.  Brush tops of ham and cheese rolls liberally with sauce, then pour remaining sauce over all.  Cover pan with foil and refrigerate for 4 to 24 hours.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Bake rolls, covered, for 10 minutes, then remove foil and bake another 10 to 15 minutes until the tops are golden brown.

Since I was making these for a crowd, here are the quantities I used:

3 bags of Sam's dinner rolls (I think there are 36 rolls per bag)
3 pkgs. of Castlewood thinly sliced Black Forest Ham (Sam's)
1-1/2 pkgs. of Tillamook pre-sliced Swiss cheese (Sam's)

That made 4 sheet pans of rolls (96 total), with a few plain rolls left over, which was perfect for guests who may not want/like ham and cheese (only my cute 4 yr. old neighbor friend preferred a pb&j).


YUM-OH.

58 comments:

  1. I love funeral sandwiches! My mom's parents lived in Tennessee my whole life, and when my grandfather passed away, his Baptist church brought in all variations of funeral sandwiches for the family luncheon following. I never knew they were actually called "Funeral Sandwiches" until years later, when the recipes started floating around pinterest.

    I grew up in Indiana, alongside my Dad's Amish family. The Amish call things "church ______", when it's for a big crowd like at their weddings. Church Cookies, Church Salad, etc. To me, that made sense. Then, I moved here to Utah and I was introduced to "Funeral Potatoes", which I quickly learned is served most often around holidays. Why "Funeral" potatoes? I asked. I was told it just means it feeds a "crowd". I guess I've gotten used to it by now. I tried telling someone I was going to make cheesy potato casserole, and when I described what it was, she said, "Oh -- you mean Funeral Potatoes!" Haha. So, I gave up trying to change the name! :)

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    1. Emma...we call them Funeral Potatoes because they are almost always served at the funeral lunches we, as members of the LDS church often provide at funerals. I have had many people at funerals that aren't members of our church come up and ask if we are serving "Those potatoes". They are such yummy comfort food!

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  2. Did you multiply the sauce recipe? How much is a cube of butter?

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    1. Linda - Yes, each recipe of the sauce will cover 1 pan of sandwiches, and I have found it best when making multiple trays to make each batch of sauce separately so each tray gets the same amount. A cube of butter = 1/2 cup.

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    2. I think that's a stick of butter :)

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    3. It is called a stick of butter in the East, a cube of butter in the West. The sticks are thinner and longer than the cubes but still 1/2 cup. Funny, huh?

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    4. I like this info, would have never known about the regional differences....

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    5. I've lived on the west coast my entire life and have never heard it called a "cube" of butter.

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    6. I agree, I've lived out west nearly my whole life and never heard it called a "cube" of butter. It is always a stick of butter whether it is a short fat one, or a long skinny one....still a stick :)

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    7. I live in the west and it was called a stick until recently. Now more often than not, it's called a cube. Either way, it's still 1/2 cup.

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  3. Thanks for getting back to me! I am absolutely going to make this for a congregational lunch that is coming up! Looks great!

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    1. I think I re energized this post! How fun! I love that so many are looking for big group recipes! I need more!

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  4. I've made these off and on for a few years. They're delicious. I've never heard them called funeral sandwiches, even after seeing them posted on Pinterest. Maybe just call them something like Hot Ham Sandwiches?

    Funeral Potatoes - Totally a Mormon thing. Lol.

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  5. Replies
    1. I would plan on one batch feeding 12. Most people will have two, some will have one, a few will have three :-)

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  6. Well, funeral potatoes do feed a crowd and they got their name, at least in Utah, because they are served at funerals, usually with ham and green beans, jello and other salads and cake. The Relief Society usually pays for the ham and beans out of their budget and the sisters donate the rest. The fun thing about any of these kinds of recipes, I think, is all of the variations that occur as each person puts their personal preferences on them. I'm looking forward to trying your sandwiches.

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  7. Have you seen a recipe using turkey slices? Wondering what the sauce would be like for turkey.

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    1. I've made them with turkey since I don't dig ham. They're delicious!

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  8. We call them ham delights but make them on much smaller rolls....thinking the bigger rolls are the way to go though :)

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    1. Ham delights! That is what we always called them and we used dinner twins in stead of a roll. The original recipe was to take the dinner twins out of the tin they come in and slice it length wise so as to make it like two layers. Put the exact ingredients as used here and then put the top layer back on. place it in the tin it came in and bake. When it came out of the oven you cut it between each roll so as to created small two-bite finger sandwiches. In the 70's it was not uncommon to see this at a bridal or baby shower or a fancy 50th anniversary party. I prefer the new way with the larger roll. Kroger has a wonderful whole wheat roll that is the same size as the one in this recipe and it is so good. Thanks for sharing this and reminding me what a wonderful treat this is.

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    2. What are dinner twins? I've never heard of them...

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  9. Having lived in Utah for 20 something years, I am well used to Funeral potato's. But I hate, despise, cry and throw a fit if someone hands me a plate full of Jello. My kids always loved it when I got sick or had a baby because they would bring in meals with Jello just for my kids. LOL These sandwiches look awesome, gonna have to try them.

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  10. Can these be made ahead and frozen?

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    1. I've never tried freezing them, but would imagine they would work fine since all the ingredients are freezable... Let me know how it works out if you try it!

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  11. I call them "Party Sandwiches." I made this or something similar and took to a church party. I got my recipe from a fellow church member.

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  12. It's funny they were called ham delights. Befor Utah got ahold of "funeral potatoes" they were called Nanny's Tatters. Also, I've lived in the west my entire life too (Utah, Nor Cal, and So. Nevada). I've heard both cube of butter and stick of butter. Most commonly cube in Nor Cal. :)

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  13. I know these as football sandwiches...slightly better name!

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  14. How did you keep the first and second batches warm while you cooked the third tray?

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    1. I have a double oven and usually bake two pans, then serve those as the remaining pan(s) is/are baking. I have also put two pans in a single oven, rotating them 5 minutes into the "uncovered" baking time, and they turned out great.

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    2. I have also served these at barely-warm-to-near-room-temperature (transferring them to a park after baking them), and people still love them.

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  15. How would these be with pepper jack cheese?

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    1. Yummy! I've tried cheddar cheese when I haven't had Swiss on hand, and they are delicious too.

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  16. I really like some of the recipes on your blog. I hope this doesn't come across as critical, but these are a couple of observations that I made. Your font, while whimsical and fun, is like trying to read the handwriting of a child. Also, as I look through the recipes, I found a lot of misspelled words. With spell check, my humble opinion is that there should never be a misspelled word on anything that is intended to be published on the internet. When I see that lack of attention to detail, it makes me leery that possibly an ingredient was left out of the recipe, the quantity is wrong, etc. because it doesn't appear that proof reading is happening. Again, I am not trying to offend, but I'm a bit of a perfectionist with recipes. I cater so am always on the look out for recipes, but I would be hesitant to try yours because of the errors and because the blog writing font is difficult. Thank you so much for your time. Good luck in the future with your blog and your grand baby!

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    1. You are welcome to read my "Why a Recipe Blog" page for a better understanding on why I post recipes. I try to avoid spelling errors if at all possible. I refer to these recipes often myself, and have yet to find an omitted ingredient. If you are leery of trying these recipes, by all means refer to a more professional blog :-)

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    2. Deb, you might want to run a spell check on your Profile Introduction. You misspelled the word much.

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    3. I also went to this critical link and found similar errors to the ones that were complained about by the poster. Maybe thinking about the Golden Rule would serve you better than grousing about trivialities.

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    4. I went to the link also, and found errors. I just love it when someone starts out with "I don't mean to be critical"...or "don't take this personally, but..." and "I don't mean to offend you..." LOL! Because, that is just exactly what they are doing! I was offended by a comment on deb's link also...I happen to love hot guys in wrangler jeans...

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    5. Deb, maybe you should try a little spell check of you own...personally I enjoy this site very "MCUH"...Oops! spell check "MUCH"

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    6. "I hope this doesn't come across as critical but...." The "but" means disregard everything i just said, and let me tell you what really mean. why bother with the pretense of trying to come across as "helpful" ? The world really doesn't need that kind of "help". If you really felt so strongly, but wanted to educate her "non critically" you could have sent her a private message instead. The extra step would have just killed you?

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    7. Deb also needs to learn to capitalize proper nouns. And show me a country male that's NOT wearing Wrangler jeans! It might possibly be Kenny Chesney (board shorts) or Tim McGraw (suits), but that's not very often! Stick with alternative music if you don't like Wranglers. And learn some manners....

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  17. Get real - there are so many SERIOUS problems in the world, don't fret about a typing error or a font type. I'm from the manual typewriter and carbons for copies days, so this is wonderful. I figure if what I type can convey my thought, then that's good. Worry about peace within our borders, ebola, health care, public schools - something that will make a difference in this world.

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  18. My sister makes these sandwiches with small croissants. They are delicious!

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  19. What could be used in place of mustard seeds? I am allergic to it and have yet to decide on a good substitute in some recipes...

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  20. Lots of similar recipes use poppy seeds. Celery seeds or hemp or chia seeds? Sesame or just leave them off. We do that for family whom small seeds play havoc with diverticulitis and other disorders.

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  21. I made these, wrapped in foil, and transported them in a crock pot as a pre-wedding lunch for those too busy to eat. They turned out well and no one passed out during the ceremony!
    So now they are wedding sandwiches as well as funeral ones.

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  22. Wonder if you could use some kind of vinegar and honey combo to replace the mustard with your allergy?..

    I've never heard of or had sandwiches like this (and learning the cube of butter was new to me too!), and am looking forward to making and serving them at a tailgate.

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  23. could they maybe be called Spirit sandwiches?

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  24. My Mom made these with croissants! Yummy! Always a hit...

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  25. These sound so delicious!!! I have a question...Can you actually put meat, cheese AND sliced fried potatoes on the rolls? I am learning :)

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  26. I think that where people are talking about potatoes in the links, they are referring to a separate dish. I have never seen any with potatoes in them...
    good luck! they are really great!

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